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Sanchez Farrar PLLC - Lawyer
Call Us Today for a
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Houston, Texas
(713) 364-0170

Austin, Texas
(512) 518-1584

Call Us Today for a Free Phone Consultation

Houston, Texas
(713) 364-0170

Austin, Texas
(512) 518-1584

Advocating For You

What should you do if you cannot afford child support?

At first, you had little trouble making child support payments when you and your ex-spouse first divorced. Now, you struggle to make your payments and meet all your other financial obligations. What should you do?

National Family Solutions offers options that you may like. Get ahead of a potential disaster so that you do not make your situation worse.

Speak to your ex

Before your former spouse gets the wrong idea, talk to him or her about your situation. Share the circumstances preventing you from meeting your child support obligations. It is better to have this conversation as soon as possible, so your ex has the chance to adjust her or his budget to account for any child support that you cannot pay. If the two of you agree to adjust the amount you owe, make the change legal with the proper paperwork.

Adjust your budget

When did you last study your budget? Sit down and look over all your expenses and streams of income. Reducing your spending could loosen up enough cash to help you cover your child support payments. Cooking at home more, getting rid of subscription or streaming services that you do not use much and negotiating your internet and phone services may help.

Visit the Child Support Enforcement Agency

Going to the Child Support Enforcement Agency in Texas may help you modify your current child support amount to something more manageable. Modifying child support requires you to explain your financial hardship with as many details as possible. Be honest and open about your situation, as the federal agency wants you to pay at least a percentage of your support if you struggle to make full payments.