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Houston, Texas
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Advocating For You

Safeguarding your child’s emotional health during divorce

On Behalf of | Dec 6, 2021 | Divorce

As a parent, you likely have various concerns regarding your children during the divorce process. For example, you could worry about your ability to secure a favorable outcome during a custody dispute, or you might have anxiety over the financial impact of divorce and the costs associated with raising a child.

It is also important to pay attention to your child’s emotional well-being as you navigate through the divorce process and in the years after ending your marriage.

How can divorce impact children?

The National Center for Biotechnology Information published research on how the divorce process can affect kids. According to this information, some children are more likely to struggle with challenges as a result of their parents getting divorced, such as depression. Some children are more likely to quit school and engage in risky behavior (such as dangerous sexual activity and drug abuse) in the wake of their parents ending their marriage.

However, it is important to note that many children process their parent’s divorce well and do not display psychological problems. Moreover, divorce is beneficial for some children, such as those exposed to abuse.

How can parents make divorce easier for children?

As a caring parent, you can take a number of steps to make your divorce easier for your children. For example, you might want to consider whether a mental health professional can help your child. If possible, you could try to work with your child’s other parent to reduce tension and reach an outcome that is favorable for both parties. Every family is in a unique position, but your child’s well-being should always remain a top priority.