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Houston, Texas
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(512) 518-1584

Advocating For You

Can nesting work for your kids after divorce?

On Behalf of | Dec 23, 2022 | Child Custody

Co-parenting children after divorce is a new and sometimes tricky process. Since you likely got divorced because you and your spouse did not see eye-to-eye, agreeing to cooperate afterward may feel like a recipe for disaster. Nesting is a different way for parents to transition from one home to two during divorce.

Is nesting a viable alternative for your family? Take a closer look at this post-divorce parenting strategy.

What happens during nesting?

Birds have one nest they return to before, during and after they become parents. Nesting after divorce is the same concept in that the children remain in one home, and the parents take turns caring for them. This allows children, especially young ones, to have some stability during a very tumultuous time.

How does it work?

A judge will not grant a divorce with children if you and your spouse do not reach a parenting time and custody schedule. If you choose to nest, this schedule will spell out which parent will live in the home with the children at any time during the week. When your time in the home ends, you would leave and return to another residence while your ex comes to the home.

This does not work if you and your spouse cannot afford more than one place to live. You could split an apartment to which each of you returns after your nesting time with the kids, or you each need to have your own place. You still then have to support the home where the children remain.

If your finances allow you to nest, you may want to consider trying it in the beginning. As your children grow and they adjust to the divorce, you may then go into a traditional co-parenting plan if you choose.